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#691094 - 12/10/05 06:57 PM Kerry Drake Detective [Re: Scrooge]
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# 113

Kerry Drake Detective # 30 - Chicago Con purchase



Content
Kerry Drake in The Case of the Mystery Mine by Al Andriola 23 pgs
Science in Investigation 1 pg feature
With the F.B.I. 1 pg feature

I will rely on two primary sources for the following dual write-up about Alfred Andriola and Kerry Drake. First the main content is from Don Markstein's Toonopedia and excerpts from Coulton Waugh's The Comics -

"Kerry Drake was a crime drama newspaper strip, following in the footsteps of Dick Tracy. But it wasn't as violent as Tracy, nor did it grab its readers on quite so visceral a level. And its protagonist wasn't quite so much a no-nonsense kind of guy. Kerry's white hair was the first tip-off that this was a different kind of crime fighter. He didn't stray as far from the Tracy template as Rip Kirby did a few years later, but he may very well have pointed the way.
Kerry set a precedent for Kirby in other ways, as well. The two strips both originated as the idea of a writer, but the artist insisted on — and got — full credit. The writer in this case was Allen Saunders, co-creator of Big Chief Wahoo, which eventually, in a couple of steps, metamorphosed into Steve Roper & Mike Nomad. Saunders also scripted Dan Dunn, a more conventional Tracy knock-off. Later, he helped set the tone on Mary Worth, which became the prototype for the post-World War II soap opera strips.



And Alfred Andriola was the artist. He'd gotten his start in the comics business by writing a fan letter to Milton Caniff about Terry & the Pirates, and subsequently taking a job in the studio Caniff shared with cartoonist Noel Sickles. By the time Kerry Drake came along, Andriola had put in several years on a comic strip about Charlie Chan, created a minor comic book superhero named Captain Triumph, and collaborated with Saunders on Dan Dunn.

Coulton Waugh's comments [first published in 1947] -

"Perhaps the brightest of the bright boys who splash ink in the Caniff manner is Alfred Andriola. He was mighty Milt's assistant back in 1935, and knows every flick of that smart wrist from scratch. By 1938, he was off on his own doing a comic strip version of "Charlie Chan" for the McNaught Syndicate. This was an adaptation of the adventures of the Chinese sleuth, a character created by Earl Derr Biggers, which had appeared in movies and story magazines.

Andriola had a healthy and understandable ambition to make a lead character of his own, and in 1942 he pulled away from "Charlie Chan" and went shopping around to see what might offer. Chances to do the well known strips "Secret Agent" and "Scorchy Smith" showed up, but these were open to the original objection. Then came a call from Publishers' Syndicate, distributors of "Dan Dunn." Dan was to run for one more year. If he would turn that strip out, Harold Anderson promised, he would be given a chance to continue with a strip of his own. So began Andriola's own strip "Kerry Drake," [on Monday, October 4 of that year — which, coincidentally, happens to have been 12th anniversary of Tracy's debut. It was popular enough to be reprinted in a Harvey comic book from 1948-52, but didn't spawn any movies, TV shows etc.]

Andriola is one of the sharpest of the new draftsmen. His stuff has sparkle and life. His boxes are direct, full of action, and uncluttered; his patter smart and smooth. He has an ability to delineate character vividly, perhaps enthusiasm has led him to overplay his hand in this respect, for at least in one instance he cooked up an overlurid characterization which led parents to protest. This is Stitches, a beast of a man with a skull face stitched along the side, who, through the course of a number of strips, tortured hero Drake by such pleasant little devices as turning on live steam while the victim is strapped in a tub. Is this what the public wants? Some editors may think so. Many of us doubt it. The strips have come quite a way from the old harsh days of the Yellow Kid. Disney has proved that one can entertain without inculcating a sense of bestiality."

Back to the Toonopedia's commentaries -

The title character was an assistant district attorney, but in the early '50s, when his fiance and secretary, Sandy Burns, was murdered, he decided to take a more active role in apprehending criminals, and joined the police force. Bulldozer, the man who killed Sandy, was one of a long succession of Tracy-style flamboyant villains. Others included Dr. Prey, Bottleneck, Mother Whistler and No Face, to name but a few. That came to an end when, in 1958, Kerry Drake married a police widow named Mindy — and this time, there were no last-minute killings to prevent the nuptials. After that, the strip shifted its focus toward the personal lives of Kerry and Mindy. There was still plenty of action (though much of it was performed by Kerry's younger brother, Lefty), but to a large extent, Kerry Drake became a sort of police-oriented soap opera.

This trend reached its apotheosis in 1967, when Mindy gave birth to quadruplets — making Kerry, without a doubt, the only white-haired father of quads in all the ranks of adventure heroes.

The "soap" approach seems to have gone over well. In 1970, Andriola received The Reuben Award, given by The National Cartoonists' Society to the Cartoonist of the Year, for his work on Kerry Drake.

A few years after that, Saunders retired. He was replaced by William Overgard, whose credits run from a Dell comic book starring Steve Canyon to Rudy, a strip about a talking, clothes-wearing chimpanzee in a world of normal humans. Andriola remained the strip's artist, though he relied heavily on assistants. Among the better known are Fran Matera, whose other credits include Treasure Chest and Little Annie Rooney, and Jerry Robinson, famous for his work on the early Batman. But the one who held that position longest was Sururi Gumen, who came on board in 1955 and stayed as long as the strip itself lasted. In 1976, he became the only person ever allowed to share credit with Andriola — but by then, he was doing the art all by himself.

Andriola died in 1983 — but even then, he didn't relinquish credit, as Kerry Drake ended with him."

According to the Comic Strip Project, here are the persons who worked on the strip -

KERRY DRAKE
Alfred Andriola 43-75
asst. Charles Raab
asst. Marvin Bradley
asst. Fran Matera 46-47
asst. Joe Pinto 50's
asst. Sururi Gumen 55-57 (p)
asst. Hy Eisman 57-59 (p)
asst. Sururi Gumen 60-76 (p)
art Sururi Gumen 76-83
asst. Al McWilliams c.76
asst. Marcia Snyder
asst. Rick DiCecca 79
wr Allen Saunders
wr William Overgard
wr John Saunders

Splash Page -



Story Page -



Story Page -



Story Page -



Ad Page for the following issue - Great Gallery of Villains, including the (in)famous Stitches (See Waugh's write-up) -




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#691095 - 12/10/05 07:57 PM Re: Kerry Drake Detective [Re: Scrooge]
rjpb Online   content
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Kerry Drakes are great reads - and pretty cheap in low grade! Despite the obvious nod to Dick Tracy, the scripting is often superior to Gould's.
One can also pick up the Blackthorne squarebounds from the late 80s to read some of the early and classic Kerry Drake arcs.

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#691096 - 12/10/05 09:49 PM Re: Ken Shannon [Re: Scrooge]
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I finally got around to read the Ken Shannon tonight and I just now noticed on the bottom left panel on the store awning, that Chuck Cuidera signed his work right there and then. Was I the last one to notice?

RJ, I am looking forward to read the Kerry Drake as well. One thing that ticked me off in the Dick Tracy comic in the collection is that, unlike the Kerry Drake, the story is To Be Continued ... and I don't plan on buying more Dick Tracy so I'll never know the end. Plus, if distribution was spotty back in the 50's, I can imagine many kids skipping issues and that must've been frustating and disappointing.

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#691097 - 12/11/05 04:08 PM Re: Ken Shannon [Re: Scrooge]
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Second Story Splash - I know all sources I saw mentioned some Jack Cole art in the issue. Can anyone confirm that this is indeed by Jack Cole?




Looks like Jack Cole to me. Around this time he often had others inking his pencils, who had also become adept at imitating his style. I look for extra little zany touches like the long nose on the guy on the far right or the kinetic action in the splash. There also a nicely captured pose/expression on the guy in the backgroun in the LR panel. It sure looks like Cole to me.
_________________________
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#691098 - 12/13/05 02:34 PM Kid Colt Outlaw [Re: Scrooge]
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# 114

Kid Colt Outlaw # 19 - Bought from Jim Payette?



Content:
Cover by Joe Maneely
9352 - Kid Colt in Revenge in Sagebrush City by Pete Tumlinson 8 pgs
9353 - Kid Colt in Mystery of the Stolen Cache! by Pete Tumlinson 4 pgs
9567 - Range Rustlers 2 pg text
9562 - The Lonely Trail by Warren Broderick 4 pgs
9351 - Kid Colt in The Big Smoke! by ? 6 1/2 pgs

Let's have Don Markstein from his entry at the Toonopedia remind us of the Kid's history -

Custom Kid Colt Figure -



"Kid Colt, Outlaw, wasn't the first western title published by Marvel Comics — but only one, Two-Gun Kid, preceded it (and … by only five months). Nor was it the last — but of Marvel's old-time western series, only Rawhide Kid continued after it was gone (and by an even slimmer margin). Between the first and the last of Kid Colt, 31 years passed, making the title character the longest-running western star in the history of American comic books. Even counting newspaper comics, only Little Joe had a greater tenure.

I was unable to find a cover scan to Kid Colt # 1 but here's the cover to All Western Winners # 2 showcasing multiple Atlas Western stars - Church Copy on sale at Metro -



Kid Colt (with his horse, Steel) debuted in his own comic, with a cover date of August, 1948. Originally, his subtitle (on the cover, but not the indicia) was "Hero of the West". It was changed "Outlaw" on the cover of the third issue, and in the indicia of the fifth. His origin story (first told in #11, September, 1950) was similar to Two-Gun's — Blaine Colt was wrongly accused of murder, and chose to run rather than try to buck an overwhelming presumption of guilt. He spent the rest of his life trying to outrun his reputation, which remained unchanged despite the fact that he used his amazing skill with a six-gun only in the cause of justice.

Here's an expanded version of the facts [from Jess Nevins' site] - "Dan Colt is the owner of the Flying-C Ranch outside of Abiline, Wyoming. Like many another rancher and former cowboy, Dan wants his son, Blaine, to be courageous and true, and says as much to Gabby, the senior hand on the Flying-C. Blaine trains himself from childhood to become an expert with his namesake gun, but he never uses it. Dan thinks that this is because Blaine is soft, and a coward. There's another reason, however--Blaine's temper:

Gabby: Why won't yuh tell him the REAL reason, Blaine?

Blaine: I can't, Gabby! He'd worry more than ever! I've kept it to myself all these months...he wouldn't sleep nights, knowing I might turn into a killer! It first happened a year ago...I started practicing with a Colt! I was fast--TOO fast! I could draw afore you could blink yore eye! You know my temper, Gabby! If I carried a Colt, I might shoot the first jasper who said somethin' I didn't like! Sure, I'm scared to wear a gun! But not scared the way Dad thinks I'm scared...I'm scared of HURTIN' SOMEONE!

This all changes one day when Dan tries to oppose Lash Larribee, the head of the "Ranchers Protection Association." Larribee cowardly guns Dan down. Blaine, furious, straps on his Colts, stalks into town, outdraws Larribee and kills him. Larribee's men then accuse Blaine of murdering Larribee, which forces Blaine to go on the run. He becomes the itinerant cowboy do-gooder known as Kid Colt, wandering the Western frontier with his horse Steel."

Kid Colt Outlaw # 12 -



Marvel apparently thought that was a pretty good back-story. They published dozens of western titles — in fact, they put out more westerns than any other American publisher — and used that origin story over and over.

Kid Colt was an immediate hit, and the publisher exploited him to the hilt. Within a couple of months, they had a western anthology title on the stands, All Western Winners, with Kid Colt a prominent feature. He maintained his own title throughout the 1950s, as well as appearing in the back pages of other characters' comics and on the covers of anthology titles like Two-Gun Western and Gunsmoke Western.

By the '60s, westerns had fallen out of favor, but Kid Colt remained on the schedule. Through most of that decade, in fact, his was one of only three titles Marvel published in that genre, the other two being Rawhide Kid and a re-tooled version of Two-Gun Kid. The artist most closely associated with him during this period was Jack Keller, whose other major credits include scores of hot rod comics published by Charlton. His comic was dropped in 1968, but came back a year later, full of reprints.

During the hiatus, Kid Colt appeared in a double-size anthology, Mighty Marvel Western, along with Rawhide and Two-Gun. This title ran from 1968-76. In the middle '70s, when Marvel experimented with extra-large editions of its most popular comics, Kid Colt was the only western so favored — Giant-Size Kid Colt ran three issues in 1975.

Eventually, though, even the most successful western comic of all succumbed to declining interest in the genre. The last issue of Kid Colt, Outlaw was #229 (April, 1979)."

All in all Kid Colt appeared in these books: All-Western Winners #2-4, Best Western #58-59, Black Rider #26-27, Ghost Rider v1 #1-6, Gunsmoke Western #32-72, Kid Colt Outlaw #1-229, Mighty Marvel Western #1-24, Rawhide Kid #50, 64, 67, Two-Gun Kid #13-14, 16-21, Two Gun Western v1 #8-14, Western Winners #5-6, Wild Western #4-6, 9-11, 20-47, 52, 54-56, Blaze of Glory #1-4, Black Panther v2 #46.

Out of these many appearances, the OSPG points out the following -
# 4 has an Anti-Wertham editorial
# 79 has the origin retold
# 102 is the last 10 cents issue
# 107 is the only sci-fi Kirby cover of the title
# 121 has a Rawhide Kid cross-over
# 125 has a Two-Gun Kid cross-over

Kid Colt Outlaw # 107 - Kirby Sci-Fi Cover -



What the OSPG fails to mention is a more esoteric Marvel cross-over in which the Kid crosses path with ... Patsy Walker!

"Patsy Walker #77 (June 1958) features a story (P-78) by Stan Lee & Al Hartley in which the whole Walker family (except Mom) are fans of the Kid Colt, Outlaw television show (wishful thinking on Stan's part?). On a trip to Hollywood, they are cast in an episode of the show, as a family in a runaway stage coach that the Kid rescues. As you might expect, they find TV work and the Kid aren't so glamorous ... except Mom, who now thinks he's great. The Kid is there, red shirt, moo-cow vest and all. Yet another Weird Pre-Hero Crossover. Interestingly, the preceding issue featured a Millie the Model crossover." [From Tom Lammers on the Atlas / Timely Group]

As for Pete Tumlinson, here's what Doc. V. has to say: "Pete Tumlinson worked as a staff artist in the Timely bullpen from 1948 until it closed inked quite often by George Klein. As a freelancer he drew Kid Colt in 1950-51 and had a nice run in many genres up through 1955. His early work possessed dark, brooding style, not unlike the very early Al Hartley of 1950-51. His later work up through 1955 is quite illustrative and reminds me of Mort Lawrence."

For a complete Romance story by Pete Tumlinson, please see I Was a Blonde Outcast - a 10-page story from Girl Comics #5, 1951. Originally slated to appear in Cowboy Romances, this story has very little romance, but plenty of adventure, which suits it for the action-packed title, Girl Comics.

It is possible that in drawing Western action which occurred between the 1870s to 1885, Pete Tumlinson channeled the memories of a namesake ancestor - Tumlinson, Peter (b. 16 NOV 1802, d. 19 SEP 1882). Peter Tumlinson was appointed by the new Texas President Sam Houston as a commander of the new incarnation of the TEXAS RANGERS. He had moved to Grimes Co. Texas in 1834. He served as a Ranger for 40 years, becoming known as "Old UNCLE PETE" Tumlinson. He Married Tennie Tidwell. They had 2 children, Absolom and William Carman, who became known as Button. His sons all followed their father into service with the Texas Rangers. On Dec. 27 1859 UnclePete led his men as part of the famous BATTLE OF BOLSA BEND, when the RANGERS won their decisive defeat of the bandit leader CORTINA near Rio Grande City.He was at the battle of San Jacinto but did not fight because he arrived late but was there for the surrender." If you want to know more about Cortina and the events of the Bolsa Bend, please read this article from the Texas Rangers Dispatch.

First Story Splash -



First Story Page - Kid Colt is not shy about using his guns and shoot people -



Second Story Splash - The previous page had nice action, and here Tumlinson provides a very nice top splash panel, much more in detail than usual in other Western from the time period



Second Story Page -



Fourth Story Splash -



Fourth Story Page -




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#691099 - 12/16/05 12:22 PM Kid Cowboy [Re: Scrooge]
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# 115

Kid Cowboy # 7 - eBay Purchase



Content
Kid Cowboy in The Medecine Show Murder! by ? 7 pgs
Kid Cowboy in The Ghost Town of Twin Buttes by Al Carreno 7 pgs
Buffalo Bill 1 pg short Bio
The Singing Cowboy in The Ghost of Hangman's Lode by ? 6 pgs
Kid Cowboy in Battle Cry! by? 5 pgs
The Little Sheriff in The Gun Fight! by ? 2 pgs
Hero of the "Dark and Bloody Ground" 1 pg Bio of Daniel Boone

Here's another book that started as a headache for coverage since it is all but forgotten and lasted only 11 issues for Ziff-Davis and continued only for a couple more under St John before disappearing for ever.

Kid Cowboy - Boy Marvel of the Wild West! # 1 -



The identity of the cover artist for # 1 and # 7 is unknown as well. What to do? Fortunately, the second story is signed by Al Carreno. My first reaction was Who? Further research proved I should know about Al. Here's what I found - First, from the Comiclopedia, here's Al's brief bio -

"Al Carreno (1905 - 1964, Mexico)

Albert "Al" Carreno was born in Mexico City. He attended the University of Mexico and moved to the United States in the mid-1920's. First working as a caricaturist on the Chicago Daily News, he later moved to New York. In 1935 he was asked to do a comic strip for an eight-page tabloid comic section. The result was a western, 'Ted Strong', but it was dropped after a few years.

Then Al Carreno went on to comic book illustration, working variously at Fox, Fawcett, National, Prize, Marvel, Pines and Ziff Davis throughout the 1940's and 1950's. He worked on titles such as 'Ibis', 'Red Gaucho', 'Captain Marvel', and 'The Blue Beetle'. In the 50's he also became active in the National Cartoonist Society and became NCS membership chairman. Carreno died in September 1964."

Now, this is a guy who worked around but had never encountered so far. Let's first concentrate on his comic book career. His credits at the GCD place him all over the board until he finds a long gig with Fawcett and his work appears in some interesting book (and I'll use that opportunity to showcase some of these great covers).

His oldest credit is for The Comics # 11 (1937) for Dell and he doesn't reappear until Feb. 1940 in Daring Mystery # 2 for Timely drawing a 10-page episode of Mr. E. "Who In Reality Is Mr. E?" -



as well as drawing "The Crime Clown" a 7-page episode of TNT and Dyna-Mite for National in World's Finest # 5 issued in Spring 1942 -



His first gig for Fawcett appears to be a Dan Dare episode for Whiz Comics # 7 in August 1940 - You can read that story online at CrimeBusters # 1 -



Al also worked for Street & Smith, then later Prize and here for Ziff-Davis. Later, as mentioned, he took over Casey Ruggles from Warren Tufts. As the Toonopedia notes, "in 1954, he [Warren Tufts] had a falling out with United Feature, and left his creation behind. Casey Ruggles was taken over by Al Carreρo (who had credits at Fawcett Publications, Quality Comics, Fox Feature Syndicate and many other 1940s comic book publishers). Readers apparently didn't take to the change, as the strip bit the dust during October, 1955.“

What is more interesting is that Al in the 30's already worked on a strip - Ted Strong for a couple years (1935-1939). While I was not able to find images from that strip, I have a suspicion that the strip was related to earlier incarnations of the Ted Strong character as known in Dime Novel such as Rough Riders Weekly -



Young Rough Riders Weekly was a weekly magazine (published by Street & Smith) for boys featuring the adventures of Deputy Marshal Ted Strong, "the ideal of every true, up-to-date boy--he is open hearted, free and treats his enemies as honestly as he does his friends." Set in the Far West, the stories focus on the hero's efforts to combat evil in harsh, undeveloped country and among rough-living characters. Miscellaneous material at the end of each issue includes a column entitled "A Chat with You" and several short stories." You can read a Ted Strong story in PDF format at Black Mask Online.

What would be more fitting than having the artist from Ted Strong draw another Kid Cowboy.

First Kid Cowboy Story Splash -



Al Carreno Splash - Notice how Al is very conscious of the size of the kids throughout the story -



Al Carreno Page - Am I imagining this or is this Madonna first appearance in a comic book? Doesn't the female character look like Madonna in the second panel? Yes / No?



Singing Cowboy Splash -



Third Kid Cowboy Splash - Notice how the rendering is more "complex" in this story -



Third Kid Cowboy Story Page -




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#691100 - 12/17/05 02:11 PM Re: Kid Cowboy [Re: Scrooge]
adamstrange Offline
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There are some nice covers in that series that I'd be interested in if I could find a nice copy.

The #1 cover artist looks like Alan Anderson and the #7 looks like Norm Saunders. They are the two most prolific of the Z-D cover painters. Alan did quite a few paintings for the Z-D Sci-Fi pulps (I have a few) and was responsible for the covers to Lars of Mars comics (per Murphy Anderson).
_________________________
"You want me to trade you my comic for small rectangular sheets of green paper with the images of dead white men?"

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#691101 - 12/17/05 03:47 PM Re: Kid Cowboy [Re: adamstrange]
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Quote:

There are some nice covers in that series that I'd be interested in if I could find a nice copy.

The #1 cover artist looks like Alan Anderson and the #7 looks like Norm Saunders. They are the two most prolific of the Z-D cover painters. Alan did quite a few paintings for the Z-D Sci-Fi pulps (I have a few) and was responsible for the covers to Lars of Mars comics (per Murphy Anderson).




See I checked with Dave Saunders's site about his dad's work before posting the entry and Dave did not have this cover as being by Norm. Considering Dave told me that there are several Anderson covers in OSPG attributed to his dad when they are not, it probably indicates that this might also be an Anderson cover?

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#691102 - 12/17/05 04:56 PM Re: Kid Cowboy [Re: Scrooge]
adamstrange Offline
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Quote:

Quote:

There are some nice covers in that series that I'd be interested in if I could find a nice copy.

The #1 cover artist looks like Alan Anderson and the #7 looks like Norm Saunders. They are the two most prolific of the Z-D cover painters. Alan did quite a few paintings for the Z-D Sci-Fi pulps (I have a few) and was responsible for the covers to Lars of Mars comics (per Murphy Anderson).




See I checked with Dave Saunders's site about his dad's work before posting the entry and Dave did not have this cover as being by Norm. Considering Dave told me that there are several Anderson covers in OSPG attributed to his dad when they are not, it probably indicates that this might also be an Anderson cover?




Since I don't have the full size comics to work with I hedged my identification by "looks like". Issues 1, 2 and 5 look like Anderson to me -- bright,slick colors -- almost as if he is depicting plastic figures. 7 looks like Saunders, but it could be a third artist entirely. I can't tell about the others because there are just small pics in Gerber.
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#691103 - 01/05/06 03:01 AM Re: Kid Cowboy [Re: adamstrange]
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Got this one in from eBay a few weeks ago - Marmaduke Mouse # 29 -



This completes the Quality comics I need, making it the 4th complete publisher. In order of completion, I finished first Lev Gleason then Dell then ECs and now Quality (just because of Marmaduke who took forever to find). This is not a surprising order even though I wouldn't have suspected Lev Gleason to be first. Goes to show how well the line was selling.

I am nearing a few other completions -

Short 1 Fiction House out of 16 - Missing Jungle 147 for some reason

Short 1 Hillman out of 8 - Romantic Confessions v.2 # 6

Short 2 ACGs out of 13 - Cookie 35 and Spy-Hunters 16

Short 2 Stars out of 10 - Popular Teen-Agers 10 and True-to-Life Romances 10

Notice that half of the books listed as missing above are Romance comics. These are tougher to find (in any grade) than people might think.

While the late run FH can be hard to come by, the late run Fawcetts are tough (still trying to get Whiz, Marvel Family, Master, the elusive Mag is Haunted and other / many assorted Westerns). I am far ahead with Atlas and DCs compared to Fawcett. St John are on par with the Fawcetts and Standard match the DCs and Avon and Harvey match Atlas.


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